Diving in Headfirst

March 4th, 2015

What in the world is AMA Tampa Bay? A while ago, I had no idea what it was. I vaguely remember reading an article in which the author said that joining a professional organization would benefit me after graduate school. “Leave it to the overachievers,” I’d say. Between pursuing a career, graduate school, household chores, being a mom, and finding time to go to the gym, being a member of ANYTHING seemed horrendous. Then, in moments of epiphany, ask myself if I want to be average. I looked around my office and saw people with awards. I saw chairmen, leaders, etc. I saw classmates regularly update their LinkedIn profiles with new positions and memberships. I knew I would never be a cut above the rest unless I worked hard for it and took advantage of every possible professional development opportunity.

Several questions ran through my head: How do I boost my resume? How do I expand my skillset? How can I learn from professionals who can mentor a rookie like me and help me grow in the marketing field? Where can I find them? All these thoughts, combined with hours of Google search culminated in me landing on the AMA website. Little did I know then that AMA Tampa Bay was the answer to a lot of these questions. I decided to join and found out soon enough. Of course, joining AMA in name alone wasn’t enough, so I decided to join as a volunteer. This is when things started to fall into place for me.

I got on the phone with Glenn Zimmerman and listened to his long list of ideas and his plan to transform AMA Tampa Bay into a more valuable organization for its members. He told me about the communications team, its long-term goals, interim goals, and how the team planned to achieve them. The overall vision was to transform AMA Tampa Bay into a strong and dynamic marketing community. Speaking to Glenn excited me and filled my head with visions of what AMA Tampa Bay could achieve and how my involvement with it would feed my bright professional future. I like to think of my AMA volunteer position as my second job. It does not pay, but it’s my way of investing in my own future. AMA has helped me by connecting me with other marketing professionals and mentors. Additionally, AMA provides me opportunities to pursue my own projects, gain skills/experience in areas unfamiliar to me, and walk away from each project as a more knowledgeable and well-seasoned marketing professional.

I – as someone who joined AMA Tampa Bay at the beginning of its transformation – have been able to learn from and drive the transformation from the very start. This type of experience is rare, invaluable, and has greatly enhanced my professional development. I’m enthusiastic to see AMA Tampa Bay grow and to welcome new volunteers who, like me, wish to enhance their careers!



About the Author

Fany Georgieva

Fany Georgieva

In 2006 Fany landed in Florida straight from Bulgaria and brought with her two Bachelor’s degrees  – Broadcast Journalism and Film Production. With such diverse, yet related academic background, she decided the right thing to do was to get a Master’s degree in “something similar”. So, she graduated from the University of South Florida with her Master’s in Strategic Communications. Currently, Fany is a Production Assistant at AVI-SPL Creative Show Services and is constantly on a quest for learning and gaining professional knowledge to establish herself in the field of Communications.

AMA Tampa Bay Member Spotlight, March 2015: Andrea Nieman

March 2nd, 2015

Each month, the AMA Tampa Bay features a member in our Member Spotlight. We have a diverse membership base with marketers representing many different disciplines and industries. Our Member Spotlight is a great way for you to you meet your fellow AMA Tampa Bay members and find others with similar interests. We had the chance to meet March’s featured member during our February 4th event, ‘The “Big Game” Commercial Viewing Party.’

Spotlight on Andrea Nieman

Andrea_Nieman

What year did you join the AMA?

2014

Describe your marketing background.

“My life in marketing started at Louisiana State University, where I earned a bachelor’s degree in marketing. [At LSU, I] showed my enthusiasm in a variety of marketing and event management roles around the LSU Athletics Department, [with] their sponsorship rights partner, and also [with] a local USL (United Soccer League) team.

I was passionate about how companies used sports to connect their brands . . . audiences [and engage them]. This led to me working for a WNBA team, the Tulsa Shock, on sponsorship strategies. The highlight with that group was working with our small staff . . . to close a sponsor for the team’s jersey.

From there, I went back to college sports to both sell and manage . . . client sponsorship campaigns on behalf of Louisiana Tech Athletics. Working around sports teams allowed me to gain insight to the marketing teams of all the clients I worked with, so I knew my heart was in marketing.

Now, I work in business development for Postano by TigerLogic. . . . I help sports teams and brands utilize a social media software platform to transform the way they listen and interact with fans through social media. It is pretty fun stuff!”

 

What was your favorite AMA event to-date, and why?

“The September luncheon, ‘Marketing Law: Building Your Marketing Empire by Avoiding Pitfalls’. The diverse panel gave some amazing perspective on a variety of topics that affect marketers on a daily basis. As a bonus, I won a free registration to the next event through the business card drawing that day!”

 

What is your favorite example of ‘really good’ marketing or advertising? Why?

“Verizon Wireless Fear of Missing Out On Football (#FMOF) campaign, specifically the ‘Road Trip with In-Laws’ spot from 2013. They created a persona that makes sense, who would interact with fans on social media, and who made live appearances at events leading up to the championship game. This allows a great flow of the messaging from TV spots to other mediums.

[Members of] the target audience could easily tweet with #FMOF whenever they found themselves in their own situations that kept them from watching football. Verizon’s solution to the problem for those tweeting about their #FMOF problems was to direct them to download the Verizon app for easy access to NFL games on-the-go.”

 

What one piece of advice would you give someone new to the field of marketing?

“Stay consistent [with] your brand . . . and invest the time in building out strategies and content that allow you to demonstrate that brand’s value to your audience.”

 

Tell us something FUN and INTERESTING about you!!!

“I am a true adventurer. When I left for college in Baton Rouge, Louisiana the idea that I didn’t know anyone there yet really excited me. St. Petersburg is my fourth city to call home since moving to college, 5th if you include study abroad. Moving is going to slow down, but my drive to explore new things will surely continue.”

 

Is there anything else you want to tell us?

“I love learning how businesses connect with sport organizations. Just as I was finishing my master’s degree at LSU, this passion was put to use as I created a pilot seminar for retired NFL players at the Stephenson Entrepreneurship Institute. This resulted in an amazing week, getting to talk business, and marketing with 12 former NFL athletes . . . [and] host reps from the NFL and NFL Players Association. [There was] much to be inspired by at that point in my career!”

 

 

 

The Buzz About Brand Journalism

March 2nd, 2015

What is brand journalism? Many marketers are curious about how brand journalism can impact their careers, companies, and clients. Soon, Lisa Arledge Powell, renowned brand journalism expert, will share her knowledge with us at our next event on March 27.  Mrs. Powell already answered a few of our basic questions about brand journalism, but there’s more to come! The interview below will give you a taste of what’s in store for the March 27 event. Enjoy!

Q&A:

 1. Do you consider “brand journalism” a new tactic in the PR/marketing world? If not new, do you consider it an under-utilized tactic?

 “Brand journalism is discovering and creating news content on behalf of a brand. Some forward-thinking PR professionals have been approaching PR in this “news-minded” way for years, myself included. However, the PR and marketing industry as a whole has just recently embraced brand journalism because of a major communications shift. Two things have happened: the way that consumers get their news has expanded and they are now more open to outlets other than the major news organizations. At the same time, the journalism business has cut staff and resources, so they are more open to considering story content from outside sources.”

 2. Why do you think brand journalism is so powerful for healthcare organizations?

 “Brand journalism is powerful for healthcare organizations because the best storytelling in this genre features compelling stories of real people. These types of personal “triumph over tragedy” . . . stories are everywhere in healthcare!  There are so many inspiring, motivating, and important stories featuring the real people being helped by healthcare organizations that need to be told. Brand journalism also gives hospitals, medical associations, and other healthcare brands the opportunity to tell their amazing stories of new studies and innovations.”

 3. Should every healthcare organization be using brand journalism? If so, why?

“When deciding whether or not to adopt a brand journalism approach, it’s important for an organization to understand their goals. If their goal is to promote sales messages in a straightforward way, then brand journalism is not the right fit. But, if a healthcare organization is looking to use a more organic approach to marketing by creating, developing, and promoting their stories . . . in a newsworthy way, then brand journalism could be the perfect choice.  . . . From our experience, hospitals that use brand journalism are able get their story in front of a large number of people within their target audience. “

Come join us to network, learn, and stay on the cutting edge of marketing! Click here to learn more about Mrs. Powell and Media Source!

Event Details:
Date: March 27, 2015
Time: 7:30am-10:30am
Location: The Chart House
7616 Courtney Campbell Trail, Tampa, FL 33607
Speaker: Lisa Arledge Powell – President and Co-founder of Media Source

About the Author

Chiara Tedone

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org

Special report – The Marketing of Meatloaf in America is in Crisis!

February 26th, 2015

meatloaf

We, at AMA Tampa Bay, came to the startling realization that, despite the striking similarities between meatloaf and hamburgers, “The Loaf” gets no love and hamburgers take it all! This is a sad situation, folks, and the marketing of meatloaf is clearly at fault. As the professional marketers that we are, it is OUR goal to save the day and win some love for the loaf! Meatloaf will no longer live in the shadow of its smug attention-hog brother, the burger.

Our survey determined that 95% of Americans actually favor the burger over the loaf. Our survey was fun and has no actual research merit, but we hypothesize that the results are true. Ask any American whether he/she would prefer a burger or meatloaf. Most will prefer the burger. If you hold up a picture of a burger next to a picture of meatloaf, the burger will get a smile and the loaf will get…all sorts of unpleasant faces. Also, check out the meatloaf.com website. It’s about as exciting as a trip to the DMV. You get the picture, here.

Now, the funny thing is that people in other countries (like Bulgaria) love and celebrate the loaf. Why do Americans make fun of it, make faces at it, and discriminate against it? This discriminatory treatment of meatloaf makes absolutely no sense. Meatloaf is real, cooked, and freshly served beef…just like burgers, so why the hating? Don’t say it’s because burgers have ketchup, lettuce, tomatoes, and a bun because no amount of dull salad garnish and cheap prepackaged bread could be responsible for this large of an image discrepancy. If we plunked all of these boring extras on top of a meatloaf, this change would not save the loaf. The crisis is clear here. We need you, marketers of Tampa Bay, to help us stop it. After all, the loaf is meat too!

Give us Feedback

You might think this is silly. However, this is a clear example of how, sometimes, brand image influences consumers’ attitude toward a product more than the product’s actual characteristics do. It provides a wonderful experiment for us collectively as marketers to see what we can do. And we need your opinion. What do you think is wrong with the branding of meatloaf?

Seeking the Love

This is just the beginning of our larger plan to transform the brand perception of the loaf. We contacted Martin Scorsese and asked him to direct a commercial showing the need for meatloaf acceptance. He showed an under-appreciated meatloaf being smuggled over the border because it’s needed elsewhere.

Then, there is the full-length action movie featuring director Michael Bay and staring the Meatloaf Transformer, a meatloaf-loving protagonist who saves the world. Meatloaf and hamburgers become Meatbots and Hambots and it ends in hamburgers being exterminated from the world. In A World Gone Dry, every hamburger wants to be a meatloaf!

Ok.. so none of that is really happening but it could! The point is, it’s not about the meat itself anymore (after all, a vegan co-authored this pro-meatloaf article). It’s about the brand!

Help us share some meatloaf pride!

Tweet an image, a concept, a story, your grandma’s recipe, a video, write a guest blog, conduct some research… yes all about meatloaf. Please help us with this fun experiment to change public perception of the loaf. Include the hashtags #activism and #savetheloaf.

 


 About the Authors

Fany Georgieva

Fany Georgieva

In 2006 Fany landed in Florida straight from Bulgaria and brought with her two Bachelor’s degrees  – Broadcast Journalism and Film Production. With such diverse, yet related academic background, she decided the right thing to do was to get a Master’s degree in “something similar”. So, she graduated from the University of South Florida with her Master’s in Strategic Communications. Currently, Fany is a Production Assistant at AVI-SPL Creative Show Services and is constantly on a quest for learning and gaining professional knowledge to establish herself in the field of Communications.

 

Chiara Tedone

Vegan Who Supports “The Loaf”

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org

3 Ways to Get Millennials Into Your Doctors Office

February 16th, 2015

MIllenial_Marketing_Chart_PicI am only one person and do not aim to speak on behalf of all Millennials (young adults born between 1980 and 1999). However, I’ll have you know that I did just score a 94% on the How Millennial Are You quiz conducted by the Pew Research Center (http://www.pewresearch.org/quiz/how-millennial-are-you/results/). This is a great resource, by the way, if you want to collect raw data about this emerging consumer segment.

So what’s the secret to marketing to my generation? Your guess is as good as ours because we don’t even know what we want. Remember when you were young and trying to “figure it all out”? Well, that is where we are right now. The difference is simple; we have an amplified social life at the tip of our fingers 24/7, thanks to mobile technology, but that doesn’t make our journey any easier.Millenial_Marketing_Dog

The typical Millennial’s stream of consciousness, listed in order from first thought to last, might look something like this:

(1) What is the meaning of life?

(2) Where will this career path lead?

(3) When was the last time I went to the dentist?

(4) Hmm, I wonder if the library is still open…

(5) Maybe I should go to the grocery store instead?

(6) Nah, I think I’ll just stay home and catch up on my Twitter feed.

THIS is why it is so hard to capture our attention. We’re over-stimulated, distracted, and we constantly need to weed out useless information. To capture our attention, despite our shrinking attention spans, you’ll have to engage us.

 

Show me why I should care and I’ll come running.

That dentist appointment and yearly check up that I’ve been putting off for months quickly gets a spot on my schedule when I see videos and articles about potential health risks. When someone educates me on a specific risk that I’m undertaking by ignoring my checkups, I’ll take note. Include a call to action and I’m hooked.

 

Grab me by the face…

Make it impossible for me to not choose your office. Get yourself on the front search page of Google with search terms like “Doctor + Tampa” and make the appointment reservation button the primary focus of your home page.

 

and hold my hand.

A friend recently told me her doctor’s office has an online reservation system that allows her to type in her name and number to be put in line to see the doctor. The system then sends her a quick text message when the doctor is almost ready to see her. She hops in the car and skips the entire time that she would have had to sit in a sterile and uncomfortable waiting room. This simple reservation system ALONE would persuade me to come to your office.

 

Build a solid online presence

Nowadays, an online presence can either legitimize your practice or ruin its reputation. It is crucial that your information is up-to-date, easy to read, and that you receive reviews from recent customers. If I can’t find your company online, then there is a significant possibility that I will think your office is either closed or nonexistent. Don’t be afraid to show off the personality of your doctors, nurses, and staff. It will help me feel connected to your staff and will remind me of the possibility that a visit to your office can actually add a bit of joy to my day. Also, don’t be afraid to get involved in online conversations. It is best practice to respond to good and bad reviews. If you receive a good review, thank the person for their kind words. If you receive a negative review, respond respectfully and use it as an opportunity for growth.


About the Author

Samantha Dipolito

Samantha_Dipolito_Blog_Pic

Samantha is life lover, a creator, and a strategist. She is a young professional with the work ethic of a farmer and is incredibly passionate about her role on the executive board for the University of South Florida’s American Marketing Association. During her college career, Samantha has connected and worked with some of the most prominent marketing professionals in the Tampa Bay Area. She has also partnered with some of USF’s most talented students to create award winning marketing campaigns for brands such as VitaminWater and Billabong. When Samantha is not studying, volunteering, or branding for clients at her Cox Media Group internship, you can find her practicing yoga and enjoying the outdoors.

February Event Recap | A Look Back at the Most Expensive Ads of the Year

February 10th, 2015

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What’s so exciting about the Super Bowl? The football game, the half-time show, and the commercials! You can put those three in the order of importance that best suits your preferences. For us – the hardcore, the dedicated, and the die-hard marketers – interest in the commercials could easily rival our interest in the game. For some of us, it does. Super Bowl commercial space is the Holy Grail, the most expensive, and the most sought after. It’s where the big dogs come to play and we wanted a front row seat!

Ad Analysis at its Finest

Ad Analysis at its Finest

 

The Big Event
On Thursday, February 4th, some of the brightest marketing minds in the Tampa Bay area gathered at Raymond James stadium with one purpose: to view the most famous and the most highly scrutinized adds in the country and to select the best of the best! The group started off by watching 24 of the commercials that aired during the big game. After viewing, each table broke into groups for lively discussions and dissected each of these commercials. Marketers considered different categories of commercials.

There were those involving brands that shifted away from their normal identity (Weight Watchers: All You Can Eat!), brands that we feel missed the mark (Toyota Camry: How Great I Am), and brands that left us with mixed feelings (McDonald’s: Pay with Lovin’).

 

The Results
The results? Well, there was no landslide win. However, after voting, AMA Tampa Bay determined that the top three commercials of this year’s Big Game were:

1.)   Weight Watchers: All You Can Eat!

2.)   BMW i3: Newfangled Idea

3.)   Tied for third place: Avocados from Mexico and No More PSA

 

Our Analysis: What made the winners winners?
 

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There are so many ads to consider!

Weight Watchers
This ad related well to potential consumers by focusing on a constant struggle they face: effort to fight temptation while living in a society that encourages large portion sizes and junk food. This ad also related exceptionally well to Super Bowl audiences in particular by focusing on the consumption of junk food as a social event: something that happens at most Super Bowl gatherings. The commercial addressed real struggles on a deeper level and ended by offering a solution. Rather than focusing on the transformation of a celebrity spokesperson, this ad handed control to the viewer. Weight watchers earned a thumbs up!

 

BMW
In this ad, BMW brilliantly compared itself to the Internet in the early 1990s. In doing so, it forced the audience to consider BMW i3 as an entity that will be as significant in the audience’s future as the Internet is in the present day. This historical reference also coaxed the audience to reconsider the future potential of products they don’t yet understand. Any ad that reframes the audience’s thinking is a success in our book!

 

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Brilliant Marketing Minds at Work

Avocados
The draft concept incorporated into this commercial was brilliant and obviously relevant to the Super Bowl. This ad captivated us with its humor. Also, showing Mexican avocados as the “draft pick” repositioned these avocados as a top grade product. The ad also tied the identity of Avocados to Mexico in such a way that an avocado from Mexico is, in the context of the ad, considered more authentic and better.

 

Domestic Abuse PSA
The PSA engaged us emotionally and mentally. First, the ad was a serious portrayal of a very real issue, which means that the mood here was a complete departure from that of the other Super Bowl commercials. This alone made it stand out. Another factor was the rawness of it. The ad featured a real 911 call from a real victim of domestic violence. She called 911, but pretended to order a pizza while skillfully masking the fear in her voice so her abuser wouldn’t discover she was calling for help. Hearing this woman’s voice is enough to give anyone chills. The knowledge that this call was real increased audience engagement and, therefore, increased the likelihood that the message made an impact.

 

Final Thoughts
The event, sponsored by MNI Targeted Marketing Inc., was certainly one for the books. It engaged us intellectually and emotionally and we were fortunate to partake. We are already looking forward to next year!  Maybe the Bucs will even make it to the Big Game! Please visit us on Facebook to see more pictures of the event <https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10152538068796114.1073741836.155686821113&type=1>!


About the Authors

Annaliese Sergent

Annie 2

Annie is the Director of Chapter Luncheons for AMA Tampa Bay. Professionally, Annie is the Director of Market Development and Client Relations at Auditwerx, a boutique CPA firm specializing in SOC reporting. Prior to this role, Annie was a marketing professional at Grant Thornton. Annie has over 8 years of marketing and sales experience and has excelled in areas such as event management, lead generation, direct marketing campaigns, account management, market research, and digital marketing. Annie earned a Bachelor in Business Administration from the University of South Florida and a Master of Science in Marketing from the University of Tampa.

Chiara Tedone

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org

The things I learned from BallywhoSocial – Measuring Social Media ROI

February 9th, 2015

Ballywho-Logo

So, yeah, I had a brilliant thought, that I was kind enough to share with all of my Facebook friends. Several hours later, no one seemed to appreciate my brilliance or my altruism. Then my marketing curiosity kicked in and I posted a ridiculous picture of my 5-year-old and me posing with our orange-peel smiles. Kaboom!!! My notifications bar exploded. My awesome thought received no attention. The silly picture of my kid received lots of attention. My random rant on a crappy day will earn me one compassionate “like”, while my filtered Instagram picture of my latest cooking endeavor will result in several new followers. You get the idea. There’s a pattern here.

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Social media is larger than life!

Do I care about social media ROI as a private user? No. Do I get a warm, fuzzy, and satisfactory feeling every time I receive a digital holler? Heck, yes! That’s why I maintain persistence.

Would I have the luxury to experiment on social media if my business were at stake? I don’t think so! Social media is a proven powerful marketing tool that requires constant engagement and should not be neglected. This is where some of the biggest challenges begin. How do we measure social media ROI and allocate budget for it?

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Ballywho Team Photo Op

Elissa Nauful, founder and President of BallywhoSocial, suggests that everyone should measure ROI differently, based on business goals. Relying simply on likes and shares can limit the depth of knowledge about your social audience. Social metrics are constantly evolving. The new revenue models for many platforms mean that many marketers can now target and measure like never before. The key is to understand what you are measuring and the business goal behind that measurement.

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Ballywhoers Hard at Work

As a company, don’t ask what platform you should use, as there is no magic formula that matches a certain type of industry to certain platforms. Rather, determine what you want social to do for you and how it combines with your larger marketing strategy. Only then can you determine how to channel the content. For instance, according to BallywhoSocial.com, if you know your target demographics, you would like to know that Twitter and Instagram users are typically 20-somethings and teens living in urban environments. Pinterest users, however, tend to be rural-area females who are slightly older than those on Twitter and Instagram. Pinterest is often touted as one of the most effective sites to drive sales and link traffic. However, it doesn’t always serve companies well in creating brand awareness.

The information you need about social media is out there, but it requires primary and secondary research. Way too many businesses opt to bypass this task. In order to be successful in the fast-changing environment of social media, do your homework and do it regularly.


About the Author:
Fany Georgieva

Fany Georgieva

In 2006 Fany landed in Florida straight from Bulgaria and brought with her two Bachelor’s degrees  – Broadcast Journalism and Film Production. With such diverse, yet related academic background, she decided the right thing to do was to get a Master’s degree in “something similar”. So, she graduated from the University of South Florida with her Master’s in Strategic Communications. Currently, Fany is a Production Assistant at AVI-SPL Creative Show Services and is constantly on a quest for learning and gaining professional knowledge to establish herself in the field of Communications.

Glass Bottom Boat Approach to Building a Website

February 2nd, 2015

“Glass bottom boat” is a term that’s being thrown around a lot among the AMA Tampa Bay volunteers. So what exactly is it? In this case, it’s not one of those fancy sunset champagne cruises cleverly disguised as a networking event.  The term is a metaphor to describe a philosophy and set of goals that will benefit our local marketing community in the long term. It involves a digital hub, a strong community, and shared value among members. Here is what the “glass bottom boat” cruise means to us:

 

The Cruise

The cruise is the journey we will all take together. It involves the work, activities, thought processes, and information sharing that will help us reach our destination. The cruise starts now with AMA Tampa Bay as it is today.

 

The Destination

Our first destination involves meeting our list of main goals for AMA Tampa Bay. Many of these relate to building our digital presence. Our objective isn’t to sell ourselves, to talk at people, or to go viral and haunt internet users like Kim Kardashian’s recent photos. Our objective is to connect with our members and help them to connect with each other. Doing this involves successfully developing the following:

 

·      A digital hub for our members via our new website

·      A strong, close-knit community of marketing professionals

·      A full and diverse event calendar that will serve as our in-person hub

·      An atmosphere of constant information sharing, opportunity sharing, and learning from each other

·      The premier marketing authority and network in the Tampa Bay area

 

Once we reach our initial destination, the goals above, we will keep moving! We will continue to evolve, improve, and change to meet the needs of our members. This is a never-ending cruise with many exciting stops!

 

The Glass Bottom

Transparency is key. We’ve committed to providing a transparent view of our makeover of AMA Tampa Bay. Just like on a glass bottom boat, the passengers will see where we are, what’s underneath us, where we’re going, and why. We will share our plans, decisions, successes, and failures. Members are free to comment and provide feedback in any of these areas. We will be listening!

 

The Oars

Our members will move the boat! We can’t depend on wind, motors, astrology, or magic spells to bring us from point A to point B. You can choose the amount and type of work that you do to help. You can row, man the lookout tower, design better oars, dance/stand on your head/perform magic tricks to keep the rowers relaxed, etc. You get the idea. If you have skills communications related skills, chances are we can use them! If you don’t have time to volunteer, we’d love your feedback about what we’re doing right and where we can improve. Don’t be shy!

 

The Champagne

Then, there’s the champagne, or replace the word champagne with the name of anything you like…chocolate, fuzzy socks, Kim Kardashian photos, etc. The champagne is the fruit of your labor, the full list of opportunities that will become available to you via volunteering for us and engaging in our community. You will gain the following:

·      Professional connections

·      Knowledge and advice of other marketing professionals

·      Access to job opportunities

·      Potential clients

·      Potential employees

·      Marketing information that’s unavailable to the general public

 

The more you volunteer with us, the more involved you will be in our community and the more opportunities will come your way. The time and effort you spend seeking out and pursuing opportunities within AMA is up to you. Everyone has different schedule and time restrictions and we respect that. After all, pursuing opportunities is like drinking champagne. It’s great in acceptable doses, but we don’t expect you to take on more than you can handle, nor do we recommend it.


About the Author

Chiara Tedone

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org

Agency Crawl

January 27th, 2015

I couldn’t wait to check out the agency crawl. The limo bus was waiting for us to all arrive and then off we went to our first stop, Sign-Age. Smiling faces greeted us as we jumped off the bus and the tour started right away. We learned that Sign-Age not only wraps cars, but it also creates signs for universities, hospitals, and all types of businesses. Sign-Age manufactures signs out of different types of interesting textured materials, including recyclable products.

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Wrapping a Car at Sign-Age

The smell of printing lightly scented the air as we stopped by an area where vehicles are wrapped. Rest assured, designing wraps is no easy feat. Not only do designers have to customize the wraps to the cars’ dimensions, but they also have to then perform installations perfectly. Patience is key here. The team at Sign-Age is great! I’m so glad to have experienced a tour of their facility, which is designed to display their plethora of products.

Next stop, Clear Channel Outdoor, which is just down the street from Sign-Age. Our ride was short, but despite this, the chatter of networking started again. We got to know our neighbors and laughed a little before we arrived at our next stop. Have you ever stood next to a billboard? Well, we did and they’re enormous! We learned that years ago each board was hand painted. Can you imagine that? Projectors would blow up a design and painters would start the process. Changing one’s mind in the last minute was costly.

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Billboards are Big in Person

Now the designs are printed on flexible material and a 14’ x48’ billboard is folded up to about a 20×20 square for transporting but the real billboard growth is taking place in digital. Where signs can be updated or completely changed in minutes rather than days.

In professional terms, ‘billboards’ are also called ‘bulletins’. We learned that bulletins are priced by the number of eyes that see them and by their positioning relative to the road. Those who have billboards on their properties are quite lucky and can collect monthly checks for pretty much the rest of their lives.

Yep, it was truly a fascinating learning experience and tour that Clear Channel Outdoor provided. Our final stop was for networking with our AMA group where  we all kicked back and shared our favorite moments of the tour with one another.  Then, the limo took us back across the Bay to our cars where we began looking forward to our next event.

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A Nice Touch!

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About the Author

Anna LynchAnna

Anna is the Director of Special Events for AMA Tampa Bay and loves to plan all types of events and network with other marketing professionals. Having spent over 7 years in marketing, she has experience in market research, project management, and media planning.

Goal-Setting For Marketing In Healthcare & Beyond

January 26th, 2015

Setting marketing goals is an art. It requires a delicate midpoint between achievable milestones and unattainable dreams. If you allow it, setting and maintaining goals can be a somewhat torturous deliberation. Understanding that the key to success is not in squashing goals and moving on but in setting them so that each marketing effort serves a purpose. Goals should be set to influence the long-term purpose of your organization. The AMA of Tampa Bay is here to help!

So, how can we keep long-term excitement in our goals?

Follow these three steps to master the art of setting goals:

 

 

Define marketing success

 

Step 1: Define your success – The most basic concept when setting marketing goals is to define what success looks like to your company and to your department. It is important to support your ideas with research. This step will insure that your long-term actions towards achieving goals will create a significant and positive impact on your company. It will not help to make up this information. Spend the extra time studying your past trends to pinpoint your strengths and weaknesses. Discover what the strengths and weaknesses of your competition. Ask yourself; what qualities do my company, or products have that will add value to our market? Do I want to get more patients in the door? Penetrate a new market? Get more leads from social media? What metrics need to be hit for us to feel successful? Be sure to explore all areas of your marketing efforts and define your success in detail.

 

writing down goals

 

Step 2: Write it down – Now that you have dreamt up the most successful, well-researched goals, you must solidify them. This means physically connecting to your goals by putting the pen to paper, or the marker to the whiteboard if you are collaborating with a team. This will provide the visualization necessary to both prioritize and create a long-term, tangible relationship with your goals.

Tip: Set a 15-minute time limit to write down every imaginable goal you can think of: big, small, silly, unrealistic, serious, quantifiable, or ambiguous. Once you’ve done this arrange them into categories. You may be surprised by the trends in your ideas.
secret to marketing success

 

Step 3: Break it down – Once you’ve written your goals, it is time to break them down. Pick two or three focus points that tie into your major business objectives and define them; these are your core goals. Then you can define sub-categories for each one; these are your supporting goals. Be sure to write your goals in the present tense, be specific, and quantify it with an end date.

 


 

Example Goal Layout for Healthcare Marketing

Core Goal #1 : Get New Patients – Use marketing efforts to increase strong patient leads by a quantifiable 10% at the end of the 1st quarter.

Secondary Goals:

  • SEO – Gain new patient awareness and conversion through blog content and calls-to-action, attracting 1 new patient/week to request an appointment online.
  • PR – Plan to host an open house in quarter 2 and send a press release out to local media, inviting them to attend. Create a relationship with a media contact to write a follow-up article in the local news about your event.
  • New Ad routes – Explore an innovative advertising route that saves money. Track the success and ROI and compare to previous efforts’ success.

Core Goal #2 : Build Patient Relationships – Brand our patient experience so that patients feel at home when they are in our office and share their feelings with their friends and family through a Friends & Family Referral Program.

Secondary Goals:

  • Incentivize staff-patient engagement – Staff will create a memorable experience with 3 patients a week, advising them to share their experiences on social media/review sites.
  • Make website user-friendly – We will add more engaging elements to the website by the end of Q1, including contact forms.

Core Goal #3 : Adopt New Trends in Health Care – Explore some of the new trends in the industry and take the first step to adopt one of them. Set quarterly goals with an end-goal of complete adoption after one year.

Secondary Goals:

  • Create an app – Come up with a concept for an app that either your patients or referring physicians can use to make their experience with you more seamless. Find a local developer to help you get it created that is within the budget you set and create a timeline for rolling it out.
  • Get ahead of price transparencyGather pricing information and create a true self-pay rate for your services and procedures so that your patients can act as consumers. Roll out a marketing plan by summer for marketing price.