Top 6 Reasons Why Our New Job Board Rocks!

April 20th, 2015

If you haven’t heard about our Chapter’s ongoing transformation, you probably need to change your Internet provider.   Since early March we’ve slowly been introducing you to the new logo in preparation for next month’s big website reveal.  We also discussed the “why” of our rebranding efforts in an earlier blog post.  And just last week we introduced you to our new job board – a value added service for AMA members and local employers alike.

Sometimes though, the really important things can get lost in the shuffle. There are a lot of irons in the proverbial fire here at AMA; from rebranding efforts to specials events to discussions on meat loaf.  If you haven’t joined in the meatloaf discussion you really are missing out.  For that reason we want to take a moment to underscore the new job board again and present you with the top 6 reasons it rocks:

  1. Employer Relevancy – No need to wade through a seemingly endless pile of resumes from job seekers who are amazingly qualified and would love to work for you, but all they’re asking for is for you to pay their relocation expenses or work remotely. Posting to our job board is the answer to targeting local marketing professionals who live in the Tampa Bay area. Let’s keep it local, we say.
  2. Candidate Relevancy – This is the flip side of the coin so-to-speak or a variation of the above theme.  The job board is exclusively for marketing jobs in the local Tampa Bay area.  If the Bay area is your home and you want to keep it that way the Tampa AMA Job Board is the place to list your resume.
  3. Branding – Companies want to attract, hire, and retain the best and the brightest.  It’s just good business.  Our job board helps employers actively build, manage and promote their corporate culture as “best in class” on a local level, which allow them to attract the best talent the bay area has to offer.
  4. Member Value – Not only does the AMA Tampa Bay Job Board pair local companies with local talent but it’s free for members and member employers alike.  A member employer is any company that has an employee that’s a member of AMA Tampa Bay.  That’s a win-win!
  5. Non-Member Value – As an added bonus, if a non-member employer hires a candidate from our Job Board – and the new hire joins AMA Tampa Bay (or is already a member) – the non-member employer can apply the posting fee to the employee’s new membership (or future renewal). The non-member employer will also be reclassified as a member and can start posting job listings for free.
  6. Community Reinvestment – Job posting fees help the Chapter support and provide exceptional professional development resources to our members and assist college students as they transition from the classroom to the workplace. The fees actively support our business and community leaders of tomorrow.

So there you have it.  The Tampa AMA job board is a first rate tool to match local employers with local marketers.  It provides companies an opportunity to promote themselves as “best in class”. It’s free to members and member employers alike and for non-member employers the posting fees can be applied to an employee’s membership fees.  It represents a great community investment.

Whether you’re looking to hire or be hired take a few moments to visit the new job board and get started.  It rocks!

Q&A with Port Tampa Bay’s Karl Strauch

April 13th, 2015

Have you registered for our April 16th event – Repositioning a Global Brand: A Case Study on Port Tampa Bay – with guest speaker Karl Strauch, VP of Branding Development and Strategic Alliances? If not, you need to hurry up because seats are limited. Don’t miss your chance to meet and learn from the marketing executive of Tampa’s largest economic engine and to learn about Port Tampa Bay’s ongoing rebranding. Here is a sneak peek of what you can expect.

 

AMA:         Who is Karl Strauch – the Marketer?
Karl:          A hybrid of disciplines – part creative director, part account executive (suit), part project manager, and a practitioner of the collaborative creative process.

AMA:         What is your background in?
Karl:          I consider myself a marketing executive working with all channels of the discipline, but my background is with advertising agencies.  I was lucky enough to experience Madison Avenue in its heyday, with the real Don Drapers and Peggy Olsons of the world.

AMA:         How long have you worked for Port Tampa Bay?
Karl:          It’s been a very active 18 months.

AMA:         What is the April event about?
Karl:          It is an interesting case study in rebranding and one that has a strong affiliation with our community. It’ll give people a better understanding of Tampa’s single largest economic engine and why this rebranding was so important.

AMA:         What is the main focus of the presentation and what are you hoping we can take from it?
Karl:          The focus is a primer into the global trade and logistics industry and how it needed to be rebranded.  The takeaways will really depend upon the background and experience of the individual but there’s something for everyone here.

AMA:         Who can benefit from attending the event?
Karl:          Marketing directors, public relations, and advertising personnel primarily, but like I said, there’s something for everyone here.

AMA:         From a marketing perspective – what is the Port currently up to?
Karl:          Creating growth in its multiple lines of business through infrastructure, operations, and finally storytelling (the marketing part).

AMA:         How has the Port marketing image changed, compared to 5 years ago for example?
Karl:          It has become more regional, more aggressive in its positioning, and more diverse in its business initiatives.

AMA:         Can you give a brief summary of what the new brand is?
Karl:          Aside from telling you we changed our name and developed a new look, no.  You’ll have to come see why we did it and understand what it means for our community.

AMA:         Any surprises during your presentation?
Karl:          Like Gallo wine, I’ll sell no wine before its time.

 

Register HERE. See you all at the Hilton.

Meatloaf Rebranding Underway: Part 3 – Central and Eastern Europe

April 13th, 2015

Readers, we need your feedback!

Readers, do you know of any other countries in Central or Eastern Europe where The Loaf can feel the love? If so, let us know! Also, which Loaf ingredients in the Bulgarian and German Loaves would you be most likely to try when cooking at home?

 Central & Eastern Europe

Meatloaf,

I trust that the chefs, wardrobe designers, and accent/culture coaches I sent you last week have been hard at work figuring out your Western Europe image and that you’ve been studying the list of countries I sent you. This week, we move to Central and Eastern Europe and evaluate how you’ll rebrand and turn yourself into a star there. You’ll need to keep away from a few of these countries for a couple of reasons, but I’ve found one where you can thrive and one that has a Loaf who can serve as an example for you. Allow me to explain.

Greece & Romania: The No Loaf

Stay away from these countries. The concept of taking a bunch of ground meat, smashing it into a large shape, and eating it is unheard of. If you, a large rectangle of meat, are seen in one of these countries, you could be mistaken for a brick, a large early 1990s cell phone, or who knows what else? The result won’t be pretty.

Germany:  “Liver Cheese,” “Flesh Cake,” & Lots of Rules! 

Rules to Follow

Germany has more Loaves than you can count. If you hate following American food rules, the Germans will love you for it and you will thrive in Germany. Now, don’t get me wrong; Germans are sticklers for rules, just not the same ones that matter to Americans. To gain fans in Germany, you must follow German rules. Believe me, the public will notice if you don’t.

Let me explain. Germans can be a poker-faced bunch. They’re known for being unflappable…unless you break a rule. For instance, try this fun little trick and get ready to see a show: Walk across a street before “The Green Man” appears on the crosswalk sign (even when there are no cars in sight). Germans will FREAK…THE HECK…OUT. It’s as if The Green Man is the Burgermeister of all pedestrians. For that matter, so is any publicly displayed sign instructing people to act a certain way. Failing to obey signs is the ultimate insult, so study up on the rules and follow them. No matter how much Germans love you, breaking a rule will land you in the doghouse.

Rules to Break

If the rules above scare you, don’t worry. You’ll be able to break plenty of the ones you’re used to following in the US. Germany has many different Loaves who break two of the fundamental rules of food. Rule 1: A dish must look appetizing to gain a fan-base. Rule 2: A dish must have an appetizing name to have a positive reputation. The German Loaves aren’t pretty and have strange names, but still have a place at every breakfast, lunch, and dinner table.

Hackbraten

Hackbraten

These Loaves are unattractive, but that doesn’t stop the Germans from sinking their teeth into them and enjoying their flavor. Next, let’s get to the names. Hackbraten is normal; it basically means “chopped meat.” Leberkäse, however, means “liver cheese”. Don’t ask me why. Many versions of this Loaf don’t contain liver or cheese. Then, there is Fleischkuchen. This means…wait for it…“flesh cake.” To be fair, “fleisch” means animal meat and human flesh, but this name would still never fly in the US. Americans nearly have heart attacks about the fact that “loaf” is a part of your name. In Germany, you can assume any frightening new alias you want…like “intestine pastry” or “gut brick”…or something else that sounds disgusting. It may make you even more popular!

Leberkäse

Leberkäse

Ingredients, Garnishes, Condiments, & Sides

Here are a few key ingredients for each type of Loaf. Leberkäse/Fleischkäse contain the following: corned beef, pork, onion, pepper, marjoram, nutmeg, bacon, and salt. Some versions contain a very small amount of liver, but many don’t. This can be eaten with potatoes (a German favorite) and other veggies. It can also be put on a piece of hearty German bread along with cheese, tomatoes, pickles, sauerkraut, mustard, or other common German garnishes. Hackbraten contains the following: corned beef, breadcrumbs, eggs, parsley, rosemary, bacon, butter, onions, pepper, carrot, beef broth, and sour cream. This can eaten in the same ways and with the same garnishes as Leberkäse/Fleischkäse.

When you’re in Germany, learn to accept Mustard, Sauerkraut, and Cheese into your entourage. These long-time superstars are the good ol’ boys’  network of all things edible in Germany. They’re important because Germans generally don’t know something is edible unless it includes one of these three. In terms of personalities, Mustard can be moody (sometimes sweet, or sour, or strong, or bitter, or spicy). Cheese can be smooth, harsh, in-between, or can even smell like feet. Sauerkraut is just always sour. These little sides are like Chihuahuas that think they’re Great Danes. They think they’re more important than the main foods they’re accompanying on the plate. They may be smaller than you are and have difficult personalities, but they’re well established, well connected, and can make or break your career. Kiss up to them and make them love you. Also, note that German Cheese and Mustard aren’t the same junk you get on a hotdog or a burger at a little league concession stand. They’re gourmet works of art, so don’t disrespect them or they’ll go Green Man on your sorry behind.

Embrace German Values: Practicality, Quality, Order, & Efficiency

Your ingredients must be fresh and top quality. You must taste superb. Why? The answer lies in German values: practicality, quality, order, and efficiency. If a food serves its purpose, does so efficiently, and is top quality, Germans will ignore all else. For example, the German chocolate, Ritter Sport contains a slogan on its package that says “Square. Practical. Good.” This description on a candy package would make any American run for the hills, but the idea of a “practical” candy would make a German smile and jump for joy. OK, that’s too extreme; it would make a German’s mouth twitch slightly upward for a second, but that’s big stuff! The idea of the chocolate being a perfect “square” that breaks up into more perfect little squares is so wonderful, orderly, and purely German that it would make many Germans instant addicts! Make sure your cook makes you to fit German values. You’ll earn extra points if you’re perfectly symmetrical.

Cooking short cuts are offensive…so offensive that there may be signs displayed somewhere commanding cooks not to use them. Germans are connoisseurs of all things meat-based, so be amazing. They’re also are non-confrontational, so if you’re mediocre, you won’t know until it’s too late to make a run for it. Germans diners will be poker faced and will take bites of you, but when nobody’s looking, they’ll spit you into their napkins and feed you to the dog. What a terrible way to end your life!

Don’t be Vegetarian

Lastly, don’t you dare try to find someone to make a vegetarian or, even worse, a vegan version of you. Germans distrust any food that doesn’t contain meat or doesn’t have the courtesy to at least appear next to meat on a plate. If you describe yourself as “vegetarian” in Germany, you will hear one of two responses: (1) “I’m so sorry. Is that a treatable illness?” (2) “AAAAHHHHH!” Then you’ll see people run, hide in their homes, and call the police to take you away. Make sure you contain meat.

The One-Name Celebrity Loaf: Bulgaria – Stefani

Stay away from Bulgaria. Bulgarians know Meatloaf well, but in Bulgaria, there’s only one Loaf. Don’t waste your time trying to replace her. Bulgarian Loaf is so iconic and famous that it has a name, Stefani. What’s her last name? I have no idea. Stefani, like Madonna, is so famous that she only needs one name! Do you want to be her? Good!

Now, chin up, kid; I’m not telling you about Stefani to make you feel jealous or worthless. I’m suggesting that you use her as an example. Become Stefani…but the American version.

rulo-stefani-potreb1

Stefani

What makes Stefani so beloved? First thing: Despite her fame and wealth, she still has a heart. Yes, a heart! It consists of a soft, tender, gooey filling of boiled eggs, carrots, and pickles. To prove to the public that she has a heart, she’s become the ultimate politician in addition to being a superstar. Stefani allows the Paparazzi to photograph her kissing babies, pretending to do manual labor, and making concerned faces while holding hands with crying children. She may be attractive, but people don’t treat her like a piece of meat because they know she’s more than a pretty face on a meaty body. She has a heart.

Stefani is also quite the fashion icon. She’s known for her shiny coat, which is a result of her being covered in egg yolks and cheese. When she’s fully cooked, the yolk and cheese turns into a shiny outer shell. You may be tempted to try your luck in Bulgaria, but don’t be stupid. There’s only one Stefani and you’ll never be her, so move on. Learn from her and become another version of Stefani…a better version!

Next Steps

Alright, kid, keep studying and prepping. I’ll be sending you a culture coach and a German rulebook, along with videos of Stefani kissing babies and holding hands. Learn, learn, learn! I’ll be in touch shortly.

Sincerely,

Chiara I. Tedone
President and CEO
Independent Food Rebranding Agency


 About the Authors

Chiara Tedone

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org


Fany Georgieva

Fany Georgieva

In 2006 Fany landed in Florida straight from Bulgaria and brought with her two Bachelor’s degrees  – Broadcast Journalism and Film Production. With such diverse, yet related academic background, she decided the right thing to do was to get a Master’s degree in “something similar”. So, she graduated from the University of South Florida with her Master’s in Strategic Communications. Currently, Fany is a Production Assistant at AVI-SPL Creative Show Services and is constantly on a quest for learning and gaining professional knowledge to establish herself in the field of Communications.

New AMA Tampa Bay Job Board

April 10th, 2015

Along with the launch of our new branding and website redesign, AMA Tampa Bay is proud to announce we’ve also revamped our Chapter’s Job Board – making it easier-than-ever for local job seekers and employers to connect.

 

Our Job Board is now optimized for mobile devices and uses a best-in-class infrastructure, improving overall speed and ease-of-use for Tampa Bay’s career-minded community.

Mobile_Job_Board
Job seekers get to search the newest marketing jobs in and around Tampa Bay for free! Email job alerts can be set up to receive any new future job postings automatically. Resumes can be posted, which hiring HR managers can search and download.

 

Employers get to showcase their openings on Tampa Bay’s preferred Job Board for marketing professionals. Plus, employers can promote themselves as “best in class” and save on relocation fees!

 

Now through May 31, all “non-member” employers can post job listings for free!

 

As part of our relaunch through the end of May, all Non-Member employers can post marketing positions for free!

 

As an added bonus, if a Non-Member employer hires a candidate from our Job Board – and the new hire joins AMA Tampa Bay (or is already a member) – the Non-Member employer can apply the posting fee to the employee’s new membership (or future renewal). The Non-Member employer will also be reclassified as a Member and can start posting job listings for free.

 

All Member employers (defined as having an employee who is a member of AMA Tampa Bay) can always post job listings for free.

 

Post or search for a job now!

 

Remember, all future posting fees help our Chapter support and provide exceptional professional development resources to our members, or assist college students as they transition from the classroom to the workplace. Sponsorship opportunities are also available.

 

We hope you’ll check out our new Job Board today. We’re confident you’ll find our updates will continue to make it one of Tampa Bay’s top destinations for finding relevant marketing jobs and qualified talent.

 

Meatloaf Rebranding Underway: Part 2 – Western Europe

April 6th, 2015

Readers, we need your feedback!

Do you come from a country where Meatloaf (or something similar) is a popular food? If not, do you know anyone who does? Please share your international versions of The Loaf and help the American Meatloaf with his brand image.

Departure from the American Loaf

Dear Meatloaf,

I was glad to receive your reply to my proposal and I was even happier to receive your check. Let’s focus on your overseas branding first. In countries where meatloaf is popular, all you have to do to be successful is be similar to the popular Loaf in each country. I know, you told me that you want to be original and “do your own thing”. That’s cute…very indie and hipster of you, but indie doesn’t sell. Do you want to be served at obscure diners that have 10 customers a day or do you want to go multiplatinum and be served at the most popular restaurants and on millions of dinner tables and? If you want multi-platinum, you’ve gotta fit in, kid. I’m going to tell you how to do it.

First off, forget your US experience. Say goodbye to the over-worked, time starved, sleep deprived parent slapping you on a pan, throwing you in the oven, squirting you with ketchup, and letting his/her kids scarf you down 15 minutes before soccer practice. Say goodbye to American kids wolfing you down as fast as they can, washing you down with chemical infused sodas, and failing to appreciate your aroma or taste.

 

Western Europe

You will be put on a pedestal in Europe. This will also help with your US rebranding. The American populous is starting to actually think that European is cool. If word gets out that you’re big in Europe, some Americans will feel cool and worldly for eating you.

 

Italy Versus France: The Polpettone Versus The Terrine

If you’d like attention from amazing cooks France and Italy are the places to be! Italians and French know food! You’ll be admired, praised, and savored like a one of a kind Picasso painting. The catch is you darn well better be perfect. French and Italian palettes are sophisticated and have zero tolerance for mediocre food. If you dare to be a sub-par Loaf, they will reprimand you, boo you off of the table, and throw you in the trash.

Your typical day will look like this: Your cook will visit the butcher, dairy farmer, egg farmer, and the produce farmer to procure the freshest ingredients. No cook will dare to use ingredients that are prepackaged, prepicked, premade, genetically modified, or chemically preserved. Cooking short cuts are a moral offense and those who eat the cook’s meal will never view the cook the same way again…so pick the right cook! If you pick a short cut taking cook, you’ll be subject to merciless criticism, unsavory rumors, and leaked Loaf Gone Wild tapes with inappropriate scenes.

Now, this is serious: France and Italy are in the middle of Food War III (I’ll explain in a minute), so don’t look too French while in Italy or too Italian while in France. What do I mean? The French Loaf is smaller and rectangular and the Italian Loaf is larger and cylindrical. Don’t be a tool and run around France looking like a giant meat cylinder thinking you’ll get away with it. Don’t be rectangular in Italy either. I mean it; you show even one 90-degree angle and you’re a dead Loaf walking! You’ll be caught in screaming matches, fistfights, sword fights, jousting tournaments, battle-ax throwing, and other medieval style savagery. Why Food War III? Each country swears to have the best food in Europe and on Earth. Food is a source of strong ethnic and cultural identity/pride and the French and Italians are very passionate and emotional about it. (If you think I’m joking, go to Italy or France and ask people what they think of the other country’s Loaf…or any food.) Tread lightly. So, let’s take a look at what image you should aspire to in each country.

 

Italian Loaf: Polpettone – IngredientsPolpettone

Polpettone means “giant meat ball”. Polpettones are large and, again, they’re round and/or cylindrical. They’re made differently depending on the city. For example, in Bologna, they you’ll want to have ground beef, pancetta, breadcrumbs, egg, Parmesan cheese, lemon juice, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, pepper, butter, and olive oil. In Florence, you should have ground veal, flour, lemon juice, sautéed carrots, sautéed onions, and parsley.

 

French Loaf: Terrine – Ingredients

France has it’s own version of The Loaf, called the Pâté or Terrine. The Terrine, again, is rectangular and smaller than the Italian Loaf.

Terrine

Terrine

A few popular Terrines include the following: Pâté de Campagne, which contains liver, pork shoulder, onions, garlic, and parsley wrapped in bacon and served with grainy mustard, cornichons, and a fresh baguette. Terrine Herbette contains pheasant meat, pork, anise liquor, and fennel seeds. There’s also Duck Terrine Mousquetaire, with duck, prunes, and Armagnac. Make sure you follow these role models if you want to hit the top of the charts in France.

French and Italian cultures differ, so make sure you fit in wherever you go. In France, play the role of the introvert. Your fans will eat you in very small groups and in quiet intimate settings. Also, be prepared for them to eat miniscule portions. Don’t be offended by the small portion size. It’s not that people don’t love you and want more of you; it’s just that…they’re French. Also, oversized plates will often be members of your entourage. Don’t resent the plates for being six times larger than tiny old you; the plates are just doing their jobs. Treat them well or they will sabotage your entire performance.

In Italy, go big or go home! Here, make sure you’re large and in charge. The further south you go, the more of you people will eat. If they eat 4 helpings of you and complain that you’re too small and there’s not enough of you, don’t be offended. They appreciate you; they’re just…Italian. In Italy, get over any shyness you have. You’ll be the center of attention, sitting right in the middle of 60 or so people (usually all relatives) having loud animated discussions for hours on end. One warning: Italians’ hands fly around when they speak. By “fly around” I mean move erratically at high speeds, with serious force, and in all directions. Steer clear of the hands; the more passionate the discussion, the more dangerous they are. Many Italian hands have mistakenly knocked food and drinks clear off the table and onto the floor. This is a known occupational hazard for Italian foods, which is why they pay an arm and a leg for workers comp’ insurance and most companies won’t even cover them. I recommend purchasing from Loaf Mutual; that’s the only company still willing to offer coverage to Italian foods.

 

The Designer Loaf: England –The Terrine

Brits also have a British version of the Terrine. In England, Terrines are considered a high-end expensive food that you’d find at a fancier restaurant, so stick with this image. Terrines can be made with any type of meat and there are also quite a few fish Terrines. If you’re a status conscious Loaf, you will fit in well in England. In England, you’ll be the Prada of food, so act expensive. To maintain your image, be fancy, only be seen with the most expensive garnishes, and act like the rest of the world is not worthy of your attention. People eating you will feel important because they’re eating you and they’ll want to be seen eating you. Best of all, they’ll praise you with accents that sound like Jude Law and Kiera Knightley. If you taste terrible, the Brits will be too polite to say it bluntly. You’ll have to listen for the British equivalent of an insult: a neutral statement NOT followed by a compliment. Here’s an example: “This Terrine tastes different than others I’ve eaten. It’s wonderful!” This means you’re awesome. “This Terrine tastes different than others I’ve eaten…(followed by the absence of a compliment).” This means they hate you. If you’re hated, look on the bright side; at least you’ll be hated subtly and in a British accent.

I’ll have another list for you next week. Remember, you have what it takes to be a superstar! We just have to work on your brand. It’s all about the brand, so study up, kid! You’ve got a lot of work to do!

Sincerely,

Chiara I. Tedone
President and CEO
Independent Food Rebranding Agency


 About the Author

Chiara Tedone

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org

Why Rebrand AMA Tampa Bay?

April 3rd, 2015

We have been slowly rolling out rebranding plans that include our website and logo, among other things. Many of you have asked a very simple, but important question: “Why rebrand?”.

Here are just some of the comments:

Glen Peak Facebook

 

Jay Roth LinkedIn

 

Explaining Reasons for Rebranding

In order to provide more perspective,  some board members and volunteers have chimed in:

Scott Morath Facebook

 

Kim Fatica LinkedIn

Then, Jay raised these good points on LinkedIn that deserve a more thorough response.

Jay Roth LinkedIn #2

How the Rebranding Process Began

This process really began as an effort to update our website and expand our digital presence. Within a short period of time,  the AMA Tampa Bay Board saw an opportunity to own the brand locally. The aim was to involve members and non-members in the process in order to give everyone a sense of ownership in the brand.

Unlike a global consumer brand like Nike or Coca-Cola, the American Marketing Association is just that: an “association” of local chapters. Perhaps a good analogy would be the states themselves. Is Florida different from California? Absolutely! Is Washington State different from Arkansas? Well, yes.

Each region is unique and that is how the AMA works. The parent organization provides a framework and a ton of support, but the success of the organization really lives or dies with how well the chapters do in localizing the experience.

Other AMA Chapters Rebranding

We are not the first and will not be the last chapter to rebrand. To give you a sense for what has been done elsewhere, here are some logos from other chapters.

Note: There are many more to peruse if you just do a google search for “American Marketing Association chapter logo”.

 

 

nama-logo-rgbtriangle-ama-logo-1 Atlanta-AMA-small

 

Benefits of Local Flavor

Due to the fact that local AMA chapters rely so heavily on local flavor, it’s important to make the local experience richer and more interactive. We want to intensify how we all connect as Tampa Bay based marketers. We want there to be an active marketing community in which members know each other, interact with each other, and leverage the knowledge each of us has. We want the AMA Tampa Bay to be that hub, whether it is in the real world or in the digital world.

Since we’ve announced our effort to rebrand, there has been a nice buzz.  While most of it has been positive, not all of it has been… and that is perfect. You might disagree with the points I have outlined and that is also great. Please continue to challenge them and continue the dialogue. In the process, we will all get to know each other and you will have a larger influence on not only what we are doing in our chapter, but also on the larger Tampa Bay marketing community itself.

Developing deeper connections through a deeper identity is the core of what we seek to accomplish.


Glenn-Pic-2 resizedAbout the Author:

Glenn Zimmerman
VP of Communications, AMA Tampa Bay

Glenn has what is best described as “Superhero Syndrome.” His affliction began as a child and has progressed with age.

He got into extreme skiing and extreme sports before they were a thing because every superhero should try flying at least once.

While at Boston University, it was his desire to save the day that brought him to Post- Soviet Russia where he explored the emerging homeless population.

His Syndrome brought him to journalism school at Syracuse University to get his MS in Mass Communications. He later became an award winning reporter with the number one station in Detroit (WXYZ-TV) and with NBC’s flagship station in New York (WNBC- TV).

And, it was the reason he formed the video agency Mad Bear Productions.

With Mad Bear, he harnesses the power of story to help business, non-profits and events engage with their target audience. Video is his tool and he wields it mightily.

Glenn is a sought after speaker on video engagement and mass media. It is all part of his quest to help save the day, one story at a time.

Contact Glenn directly at: glenn@madbearproductions.com

Meatloaf Rebranding Underway: Part 1

March 30th, 2015
Hiding/Awaiting Reinvention

Hiding Out Awaiting Reinvention

Touring the World

Touring the World

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Readers, give us your feedback!

  • In your opinion, what is wrong with the way Meatloaf is branded and what would improve its image?
  • Do you make a meatloaf that people love? If so, how do you make it? Send us pictures or recipes.
  • As food for thought, here is an open letter to American Meatloaf before we look for branding inspirations around the world.

Dear American Meatloaf,

I know you’re sick of living your life in the shadow of your glory hog sibling, Hamburger. You and Burger are made of the same stuff, but he gets all the love and you’re treated like slop. You look in the mirror and probably see the food kingdom’s version of a washed-up B list celebrity seeking the limelight after too much time off, too much plastic surgery, and an orange fake tan. Well, don’t fret because this is not you.

You, my friend, are the food kingdom’s Madonna! You’re talented, you’re well rounded, and you’ve got the goods to reinvent yourself every decade and stay at the top of the food charts until your ground beef runs dry. Listen though; you don’t need Yoga, Botox, and a personal trainer to keep you fabulous. You need a personal branding agent. Branding is to blame and branding is why Burger gets the love and you get the shaft. That’s why I’m reaching out to you. I can be your personal branding agent. If you stick with me, I’ll take you places.

Want proof? I’ve been around the block with foods like you before. Remember how in the 1980s and 90s, many thought Spinach and Kale were “gross” and Wheat Grass was unheard of? Now, they’re the main ingredients in those green smoothies all the celebs carry around like fashion accessories while they stroll around in their $300 Yoga pants and smile for the Paparazzi. They’re cool, hip, and sophisticated foods now. Why the rise from zero to hero? Spinach, Kale, and Wheat Grass were my clients; that’s why! I turned them around. Those three were just a bunch of broke jokers when I got a hold of them and not a single cook wanted them. Now they’re premium top shelf items at Whole Foods and Oprah can’t even get an interview with them.

I can do that for you! What I’m proposing is a reinvention. I’m talking about something a little more than changing your garnish and renaming yourself The Meal Formerly Known as Meatloaf. We’ll keep your basics the same, but make you more exciting. Also, I know talent when I see it and I think you have what it takes to go international. We’ll need to create a brand that will work overseas and in the US. When you’re on tour, we’ll need to tweak your image based on what different audiences around the world want.

So, let’s talk rebranding. For your US rebranding, you’ll need to hide out for a while…just enough time for the public to forget the old you while we create the new you. I recommend using the large sunglasses, a wig, a hat, and the usual ensemble that people in “the biz” use to disguise themselves after they’ve been arrested or had personal problems. In terms of your overseas rebranding, you will receive a list of countries. Study up and prepare to tweak your image for fans in each country.

Of course, you could take this project on by yourself and become just another starving food trying to make it in the big bad city, but I don’t recommend it. I have all of the connections needed to bring you to the top. The last several meat foods who refused my services and tried to rebrand themselves without an agent failed miserably. They ended up in places with high concentrations of passionate animal rights activists and vegans…basically, some ended up in hippy communes and others ended up in LA. These are not fun places to be a hunk of meat. These poor do-it-yourselfers were never eaten and left to rot.

It’s a dog eat dog world out there, kid, and the only one who will look out for you is you…and me, of course….once you sign the contract and pay me my initial consulting fee. Invest in your future and give me a call. I’ll send you that list of countries.

Sincerely,

Chiara I. Tedone
President and CEO
Independent Food Rebranding Agency

 


 About the Author

Chiara Tedone

Chiara Tedone

Chiara is Digital Content Creator and Blog Manager for AMA Tampa Bay. She is Co-founder and Director of Winning the Fight, a non-profit organization specializing in neurodegenerative disease research. She also is earning her MBA with a specialty in marketing from the University of South Florida. Prior to switching careers to be near family and becoming a marketing professional, Chiara worked in national defense in Washington, DC. She served the United States Department of Defense with a focus on global terrorism issues. Prior to working in defense, she earned her BA in International Studies from American University’s School of International Services in 2007. Chiara’s hobbies include obstacle racing, running, swimming, kayaking, SCUBA diving, and opera/classical singing. She also loves country music and chocolate!

You can contact Chiara at Chiara@winningthefight.org

Building Your Brand in HealthCare

March 16th, 2015

“Every brand makes promises. When a brand consistently fulfills its promises, it builds brand loyalty.”

Leke Alder, International Author

To successfully build or redefine your healthcare brand, there’s a single component you must identify before you start your brand platform. What is a brand platform? A brand platform establishes a foundation on which to build an enduring brand so patients build long-term loyalty and preference toward your brand. A brand platform provides structure for consistent and cost-effective messaging and differentiates your brand from the competition. Most importantly, the brand platform will set a direction for your internal operations and culture. It’s important not to confuse a brand platform with a one-time “campaign” or short-term spikes in conversations and conversions. Your brand platform is meant to be the long-lasting emotional foundation from which your brand messaging is executed over time.

To determine your brand platform, use your brand’s history combined with research. Think of what makes your brand unique. Do you have the best physicians in town? Do you have expertise in a particular specialty? Once you articulate your unique brand, there are fundamental areas you must address to be successful:

  1. Culture:       Your brand platform is now the culture in which your brand lives every day. Operationally, every employee must buy into your culture, as every employee plays an important role in delivering the brand promise.
  2. Commitment: Following a brand platform requires long-term commitment to following your set strategy. Results don’t happen overnight. If you remain dedicated, your brand will grow stronger. This will lead to long-term sustained increase in patient volume.
  3. Investment: This complex strategy takes an immense investment of time and resources. If this investment remains consistent, it will build up your brand awareness and ultimately move you to the top of your consumers’ minds.

The previous quote bears repeating. “Every brand makes promises. When a brand consistently fulfills its promises, it builds brand loyalty.” Following this idea and sticking to your brand platform will build an everlasting brand affinity.


About the Author

Colleen Chappell

ColleenChappell

 Colleen knows what it’s like to sit in a Chief Marketing Officer’s chair or lead a business sales channel from the ground up. Top-tier national agencies once called her the client, and that experience has proven invaluable on the agency side of the business. Leveraging nearly 25 years of experience, she specializes in brand development, integrated marketing, advertising, public relations, pricing strategies and distribution channel launch and growth. Colleen brings an unstoppable stream of enthusiasm to the agency.

In 2010, she was named Tampa Bay’s Businesswoman of the Year by the Tampa Bay Business Journal and University of South Florida’s School of Mass Communications Outstanding Alumnus. In 2012, Colleen was recognized with the coveted international Bronze Stevie Award for Business Services Female Executive of the Year.

Colleen has a Bachelor of Arts in mass communications from the University of South Florida, is a Dale Carnegie graduate, and is accredited in public relations by the Public Relations Society of America. She serves on the executive boards of the Tampa Bay Partnership, the Tampa Hillsborough Economic Development Corporation, and the American Marketing Association Global Headquarters Professional Chapters Council.

10 Tips for Creating Engaging Videos

March 9th, 2015

When working on a video project, you need to be in storyteller mode. Importantly, you’re not just imparting information; you’re crafting a story that you hope will connect with specific audiences on some significant level. The challenge is that there are many variables that can prevent that connection from happening: bad lighting, a nervous interview subject, poor audio, or content that doesn’t give the viewer a reason to care, to name a few.

In this post, I’m sharing 10 video production and interview tips that have helped me create more engaging videos and be a more effective storyteller.

1. The Interviewer – Select an interviewer who is well acquainted with the subject matter and can speak with the interview subject as a peer. In my opinion, there is nothing more important than the choice of the interviewer. Anyone can read a list of questions, one after another. It takes a special person to engage an interview subject in a thoughtful conversation. That should be the goal.

2. The Interview – Most interviewers have a well thought out list of questions. The really good interviewers seldom refer to them during the interview. It can’t be conversational if you’re simply moving from one question to another. Good interviews are nothing more than good conversations; let the conversation flow and ask follow-up questions. If you’re lucky, you’ll never need to refer to that list of questions.

3. Nervous Interview Subjects – Regardless of how experienced interviewees are, they tend to be nervous in front of a cameras. One technique I like to employ is to use the end of the interview to come back to some of the things we discussed early on. By the end of the interview, the subject is much more comfortable, and that shows on camera. So, if you had them introduce themselves in the very beginning, have them do it again as you’re wrapping up. I guarantee you’ll get a more comfortable and confident response.

4. Ask Unexpected Questions – When I’m interviewing physicians on camera, one of my favorite questions is: “When you’re driving home from work and you’ve had a really good day, what is likely to have happened to make it such a good day?” This type of question puts the physician in storytelling mode.

5. Two Cameras – Having a two camera set up will make editing a whole lot easier. When you’re piecing together an interview, having that footage from the second camera allows you to make seamless edits and salvage cuts that might otherwise be unusable.

6. Avoid Scripts – When the interview subject arrives with scripted answers, the end product is likely to be stiff and will lack authenticity. My advice is to avoid scripts whenever possible. Schedule enough time (45 minutes should be plenty) for a comfortably paced interview with your subject.

7. Repeat Yourself – When an interview subject gives you a good answer or says something of interest, you should feel comfortable asking him or her to say it again. I begin interviews telling subjects that I will stop them at times and ask them to repeat themselves when I hear something I like. I also explain that I do this in order to get the best possible cut. They understand and appreciate my attempt to portray them in the best possible light.

8. Keep Things Light – When we film physicians, we usually have a crew of at least seven people in the room along with a ton of equipment. There’s the interviewer, the art director, the producer, a videographer, an audio person, a grip, and a hair and make-up person. It looks like we’re filming a small movie. In that setting, it would be understandable if the individual felt intimidated. For this reason, we work to create a light-hearted tone on the set. We joke with each other, tell stories about our families, and try to put subjects at ease.

9. Create a Window – A good interview, once edited, will provide a window into the life of your subject. You should give your viewers a small glimpse into the personality and humanity of your subject. As you’re conducting the interview, you should ask yourself why the viewer is going to care about this video? Where is the emotional connection going to form? You should strive to find that little window that will help you make a connection between the viewer and the subject.

10. See the Light – Poor quality videos usually have two things in common: bad lighting and horrible audio. If you plan to produce a number of videos each year, invest in a light kit. Good lighting can make a world of difference. When it comes to quality audio, you need a quiet space while you’re recording. Background noise will ruin an otherwise awesome video. If you don’t have a quiet space at your facility, rent out a conference room at a hotel for the day; you’ll have fewer interruptions and more room to spread out. One note of caution: Beware of loud air conditioning and heating systems that are all too common in many conference rooms and meeting spaces.

With those tips in hand, I encourage you to strive to create impactful videos that will engage audiences and deepen their connection with your organization.


About the Author

Dan Dunlop

Dan_Dunlop

Dan is principal of Jennings Healthcare Marketing, a leading marketing and audience engagement firm. He is an innovator, brand consultant, blogger, author, and thought leader in healthcare marketing. Dan is also highly sought-after as a speaker and is regularly a faculty member at national and regional healthcare conferences.

Presently, he serves on the editorial boards of Healthcare Marketing Advisor and eHealthcare Strategy & Trends. He is also a contributor to a number of healthcare marketing publications and news services including the following: Ragan’s Health Care Communication News, SmartBrief for Health Care Marketers, Healthcare Strategy Alert, and Healthcare Marketing Report. Dan also is a board member of the New England Society for Healthcare Communications (NESHCo) and serves on the judging panels of the Web Health Awards and the National Health Information Awards. Additionally, Dan is a former member of SHSMD’s 2014 Digital Engagement Taskforce.

 

 

 

 

Diving in Headfirst

March 4th, 2015

What in the world is AMA Tampa Bay? A while ago, I had no idea what it was. I vaguely remember reading an article in which the author said that joining a professional organization would benefit me after graduate school. “Leave it to the overachievers,” I’d say. Between pursuing a career, graduate school, household chores, being a mom, and finding time to go to the gym, being a member of ANYTHING seemed horrendous. Then, in moments of epiphany, ask myself if I want to be average. I looked around my office and saw people with awards. I saw chairmen, leaders, etc. I saw classmates regularly update their LinkedIn profiles with new positions and memberships. I knew I would never be a cut above the rest unless I worked hard for it and took advantage of every possible professional development opportunity.

Several questions ran through my head: How do I boost my resume? How do I expand my skillset? How can I learn from professionals who can mentor a rookie like me and help me grow in the marketing field? Where can I find them? All these thoughts, combined with hours of Google search culminated in me landing on the AMA website. Little did I know then that AMA Tampa Bay was the answer to a lot of these questions. I decided to join and found out soon enough. Of course, joining AMA in name alone wasn’t enough, so I decided to join as a volunteer. This is when things started to fall into place for me.

I got on the phone with Glenn Zimmerman and listened to his long list of ideas and his plan to transform AMA Tampa Bay into a more valuable organization for its members. He told me about the communications team, its long-term goals, interim goals, and how the team planned to achieve them. The overall vision was to transform AMA Tampa Bay into a strong and dynamic marketing community. Speaking to Glenn excited me and filled my head with visions of what AMA Tampa Bay could achieve and how my involvement with it would feed my bright professional future. I like to think of my AMA volunteer position as my second job. It does not pay, but it’s my way of investing in my own future. AMA has helped me by connecting me with other marketing professionals and mentors. Additionally, AMA provides me opportunities to pursue my own projects, gain skills/experience in areas unfamiliar to me, and walk away from each project as a more knowledgeable and well-seasoned marketing professional.

I – as someone who joined AMA Tampa Bay at the beginning of its transformation – have been able to learn from and drive the transformation from the very start. This type of experience is rare, invaluable, and has greatly enhanced my professional development. I’m enthusiastic to see AMA Tampa Bay grow and to welcome new volunteers who, like me, wish to enhance their careers!



About the Author

Fany Georgieva

Fany Georgieva

In 2006 Fany landed in Florida straight from Bulgaria and brought with her two Bachelor’s degrees  – Broadcast Journalism and Film Production. With such diverse, yet related academic background, she decided the right thing to do was to get a Master’s degree in “something similar”. So, she graduated from the University of South Florida with her Master’s in Strategic Communications. Currently, Fany is a Production Assistant at AVI-SPL Creative Show Services and is constantly on a quest for learning and gaining professional knowledge to establish herself in the field of Communications.